Estados Unidos entrega la prueba de que Pinochet ordenó el asesinato de Orlando Letelier

Desclasificados los últimos documentos sobre el asesinato en EE UU del canciller de Allende
Por Silvia Ayuso,
El País, 23/09/2016

Estados Unidos entregó este viernes a la presidenta chilena, Michelle Bachelet, los últimos documentos desclasificados que demuestran que el dictador Augusto Pinochet ordenó el asesinato en Washington del último canciller del derrocado gobierno de Salvador Allende, Orlando Letelier, hace 40 años.
El más interesante es el documento original de la CIA que afirma que Pinochet fue el que ordenó la creación de un comando que atentara contra Letelier, un político incómodo para la dictadura por sus constantes denuncias en Washington, aliado clave en esa época del dictador, de los crímenes cometidos por el régimen autoritario de Santiago.

“Una revisión de nuestros archivos sobre el asesinato de Letelier nos ha proporcionado lo que consideramos pruebas convincentes de que Pinochet ordenó a su jefe de inteligencia perpetrar el asesinato”, señala el informe de la CIA fechado el 1 de mayo de 1987, redactado durante el Gobierno de Ronald Reagan.

Que la mano de Pinochet estaba detrás del asesinato de Letelier era algo de lo que nadie duda desde hace tiempo. Ya el año pasado se desclasificó un primer paquete de documentos entre los que figura un memorando del entonces secretario de Estado, George Shultz, enviado en octubre de 1987 a Reagan. En él, Shultz cita ese informe de la CIA para responsabilizar a Pinochet. Pero faltaba —hasta hoy— el documento original, el “santo grial”, como lo ha denominado el investigador estadounidense Peter Kornbluh, responsable en buena parte de que EE UU haya desclasificado tantos documentos sobre la dictadura chilena (…)

Para seguir leyendo: http://internacional.elpais.com/internacional/2016/09/23/estados_unidos/1474658001_549935.html

 

The Dominican Intervention 1965

National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 513
Edited by David Coleman

Washington, D.C., April 28, 2015
LBJ Regretted Ordering U.S. Troops into Dominican Republic in 1965 (…) Dominican Intervention 50 Years Ago Sparked Mainly by Fear of Communists: “I Sure Don’t Want to Wake Up … and Find Out Castro’s in Charge,” President Said
New Transcripts of Key White House Tapes Clarify and Illuminate LBJ’s Personal Role in Decision-Making during the Crisis

– President Lyndon Johnson regretted sending U.S. troops into the Dominican Republic in 1965, telling aides less than a month later, “I don’t want to be an intervenor,” according to new transcripts of White House tapes published today (along with the tapes themselves) for the first time by the National Security Archive at George Washington University (www.nsarchive.org).
Johnson ordered U.S. Marines into Santo Domingo 50 years ago today. Three weeks later, he lamented both that the crisis had cost American lives and that it had turned out badly on the ground as well as for the United States’ – and Johnson’s own – political standing. Nevertheless, he insisted he would “do the same thing right this second.”
In conversations with aides captured on the White House taping system, Johnson expressed sharp frustrations, including with the group surrounding exiled President Juan Bosch, whom the United States was supporting. Speaking in late May 1965, Johnson told an adviser, “they have to clean themselves up, as I see it, where we can live with them. Put enough perfume on to kill the odor of killing 20 Americans and wounding 100.”
Johnson’s public explanation for sending the Marines into Santo Domingo was to rescue Americans endangered by civil war conditions in the Dominican Republic. But his main motivation, the tapes and transcripts confirm, was to prevent a Communist takeover. Basing his decision largely on assertions by the CIA and others in the U.S. government that Cuba’s Fidel Castro had been behind the recent uprising, Johnson confided to his national security advisor, “I sure don’t want to wake up … and find out Castro’s in charge.”
That intelligence, along with other information Johnson received during the crisis, turned out to be erroneous – a possibility LBJ himself worried about at the time.
The tapes, transcript and introductory material presented in this posting were provided by David Coleman, former chair of the Presidential Recordings Program at the Miller Center at the University of Virginia, and a Fellow at the National Security Archive. As Coleman notes, the materials are revelatory about Johnson’s personal conduct of the crisis and his decision-making style as president. The transcripts, in several cases newly created by Coleman, are crucial to understanding the material on the tapes, which can be hard to decipher and are therefore often of limited usefulness on their own to researchers (…)
http://nsarchive.gwu.edu/NSAEBB/NSAEBB513/

RELATED SITES
Telephone Conversations Collection at the LBJ Library
LBJ White House Recordings at the Miller Center, University of Virginia

For more on this context, see: Randall B. Woods, LBJ: Architect of American Ambition (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2007), p.633; Alan McPherson, “Misled by Himself: What the Johnson Tapes Reveal About the Dominican Intervention of 1965,” Latin American Research Review, Vol. 38, No. 2 (June 2003): 127-46

U.S. Covert Intervention in Chile: Planning to Block Allende Began Long before September 1970 Election

U.S. Covert Intervention in Chile: Planning to Block Allende Began Long before September 1970 Election
Nixon Alerted in Advance to Date of Coup, Retired CIA Operative Writes in Foreign Affairs
Archive Commends Long-Awaited Release of State Department Compendium of Records on U.S. Involvement in Promoting Chilean Coup
National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 470

Posted May 23, 2014
For more information contact:
peter.kornbluh@gmail.com

The Pinochet File
By Peter Kornbluh, The New Press, Updated edition (September 11, 2013)

Washington, DC, May 23, 2014 – Covert U.S. planning to block the democratic election of Salvador Allende in Chile began weeks before his September 4, 1970, victory, according to just declassified minutes of an August 19, 1970, meeting of the high-level interagency committee known as the Special Review Group, chaired by National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger. “Kissinger asked that the plan be as precise as possible and include what orders would be given September 5, to whom, and in what way,” as the summary recorded Kissinger’s instructions to CIA Director Richard Helms. “Kissinger said we should present to the President an action plan to prevent [the Chilean Congress from ratifying] an Allende victory…and noted that the President may decide to move even if we do not recommend it.”

The document is one of a compendium of some 366 records released by the State Department as part of its Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS) series. The much-delayed collection, titled “Chile: 1969-1973,” addresses Richard Nixon’s and Kissinger’s efforts to destabilize the democratically elected Socialist government of Salvador Allende, and the U.S.-supported coup that brought General Augusto Pinochet to power in 1973. The controversial volume was edited by two former officials of the State Department’s Office of the Historian, James Siekmeier and James McElveen.

“This collection represents a substantive step forward in opening the historical record on U.S. intervention in Chile,” said Peter Kornbluh, who directs the Chile documentation project at the National Security Archive, and is the author of The Pinochet File (…)

In the aftermath of General Augusto Pinochet’s arrest in October 1998, the National Security Archive, along with victims of the Pinochet regime, led a campaign to press the Clinton administration to declassify the still-secret documents on Chile, the coup and the repression that followed (…) The release of the records comes amidst renewed debate over the CIA role in supporting the military coup in Chile.

The Kissinger-Nixon transcript is reproduced in the 2013 edition of The Pinochet File. http://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1969-76v21

CIA Sued for « Holding History Hostage » on Bay of Pigs Invasion

National Security Archive Update, April 14, 2011

CIA Sued for “Holding History Hostage” on Bay of Pigs Invasion

National Security Archive files FOIA lawsuit to Force Release of
“Official History of the Bay of Pigs Operation” on 50th Anniversary

Former Guatemalan Soldier Arrested for Alleged Role in Dos Erres Massacre

Former Guatemalan Soldier Convicted to Ten Years for Lying About Role in Dos Erres Massacre.
Declassified documents show that U.S. officials knew the Guatemalan Army was responsible for the 1982 mass murder.
National Security Archive Electronic Briefin…

Former Guatemalan Soldier Convicted to Ten Years for Lying About Role in Dos Erres Massacre.
Declassified documents show that U.S. officials knew the Guatemalan Army was responsible for the 1982 mass murder.
National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 316; Updated – September 16, 2010

The National Security Archive – Update Uruguay

Washington, DC, August 11, 2010 – Documents posted by the National Security Archive on the 40th anniversary of the death of U.S. advisor Dan Mitrione in Uruguay show the Nixon administration recommended a "threat to kill [detained insurgent] Sendi…

Washington, DC, August 11, 2010 – Documents posted by the National Security Archive on the 40th anniversary of the death of U.S. advisor Dan Mitrione in Uruguay show the Nixon administration recommended a "threat to kill [detained insurgent] Sendic and other key [leftist insurgent] MLN prisoners if Mitrione is killed." The secret cable from U.S. Secretary of State William Rogers, made public here for the first time, instructed U.S. Ambassador Charles Adair: "If this has not been considered, you should raise it with the Government of Uruguay at once."

The National Security Archive – Update Uruguay

Washington, DC, August 11, 2010 – Documents posted by the National Security Archive on the 40th anniversary of the death of U.S. advisor Dan Mitrione in Uruguay show the Nixon administration recommended a "threat to kill [detained insurgent] Sendi…

Washington, DC, August 11, 2010 – Documents posted by the National Security Archive on the 40th anniversary of the death of U.S. advisor Dan Mitrione in Uruguay show the Nixon administration recommended a "threat to kill [detained insurgent] Sendic and other key [leftist insurgent] MLN prisoners if Mitrione is killed." The secret cable from U.S. Secretary of State William Rogers, made public here for the first time, instructed U.S. Ambassador Charles Adair: "If this has not been considered, you should raise it with the Government of Uruguay at once."